AY 21 courses: Fall 20, Spring 21 & Summer 21

FALL 2020

Language Courses

Elementary Modern Greek I, Nikolas P. Kakkoufa
GRKM UN1101
M/W, 12:10pm-2:00pm
Method of Instruction: On-Line Only

This is the first semester of a year-long course designed for students wishing to learn Greek as it is written and spoken in Greece today. As well as learning the skills necessary to read texts of moderate difficulty and converse on a wide range of topics, students explore Modern Greece's cultural landscape from "parea" to poetry to politics. Special attention will be paid to Greek New York. How do "our", "American", "Greek-American" definitions of language and culture differ from "their", "Greek" ones?


Intermediate Modern Greek I, Nikolas P. Kakkoufa
GRKM UN2101pm
M/W, 6:10pm-8:00pm
Method of Instruction: On-Line Only

This course is designed for students who are already familiar with the basic grammar and syntax of modern Greek language and can communicate at an elementary level. Using films, newspapers, and popular songs, students engage the finer points of Greek grammar and syntax and enrich their vocabulary. Emphasis is given to writing, whether in the form of film and book reviews or essays on particular topics taken from a selection of second-year textbooks.

Class times flexible. For more information please contact the instructor.

Literature, Culture & History

Greece today: language, literature, and culture, Nikolas P. Kakkoufa
GRKM UN3003
M/W, 4:10pm-5:25pm
Method of Instruction: On-Line Only

This course builds on the elements of the language acquired in GRKM1101 through 2102, but new students may place into it, after special arrangement with the instructor. It introduces the students to a number of authentic multimodal materials drawn from a range of sources which include films, literary texts, media, music etc. in order to better understand Greece’s current cultural, socioeconomic, and political landscape. In doing so, it aims to foster transcultural understanding and intercultural competence, while further developing the four language skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing. Topics of discussion include language, gender equality, youth unemployment, education, queer identities, refugees, and the multilayered aspects of the crisis.

Class times flexible. For more information please contact the instructor.


Hellenism and the Topographical Imagination, Dimitris Antoniou
GRKM UN3935
T, 2:10pm-4:00pm
Method of Instruction: On-Line Only

This course examines the way particular spaces—cultural, urban, literary—serve as sites for the production and reproduction of cultural and political imaginaries. It places particular emphasis on the themes of the polis, the city, and the nation-state as well as on spatial representations of and responses to notions of the Hellenic across time. Students will consider a wide range of texts as spaces—complex sites constituted and complicated by a multiplicity of languages—and ask: To what extent is meaning and cultural identity, sitespecific? How central is the classical past in Western imagination? How have great metropolises such as Paris, Istanbul, and New York fashioned themselves in response to the allure of the classical and the advent of modern Greece? How has Greece as a specific site shaped the study of the Cold War, dictatorships, and crisis? This course fulfills the global core requirement.

Retranslation: Worlding C.P. Cavafy, Karen Van Dyck
CLGM GU4300
T, 6:10pm-8:00pm
Method of Instruction: Hybrid

By examining the poetry of the Greek Diaspora poet Cavafy in all its permutations, the case of a canonical author becomes experimental ground for opening up theories and practices of translation and world literature. Students will choose a group of poems by Cavafy or a work by another author with a considerable body of critical work and translations and, following the example of Cavafy and his translators, come up with their own retranslations (whether queer, visual, archival, theatrical). Works read include commentary by E. M. Forster, C. M. Bowra, and Roman Jakobson, translations by James Merrill, Marguerite Yourcenar, and Daniel Mendelsohn, poems by W. H. Auden, Lawrence Durrell, and Joseph Brodsky, and visual art by David Hockney and Duane Michals.

Cross-listed Courses

Travel Literature in and from the Mediterranean, 18th-19th centuries, Konstantina Zanou
CLIA GU4023
TR, 6:10pm-8:00pm
Method of Instruction: On-Line Only

This course will study various forms of travel writing within, from, and to the Mediterranean in the long nineteenth century. Throughout the semester, you will read a number of travel accounts to develop your understanding of these particular sources and reflect on the theoretical discussions and the themes framing them, namely orientalism, postcolonial studies, imaginative geographies, literature between fiction and reality, Romantic and autobiographical writing, gender, sexuality and the body, the rise of archeology, adventurism, mass migration and tourism. We will focus on Italian travel writers visiting the Ottoman Empire and the Americas (Cristina di Belgioioso, Gaetano Osculati, Edmondo de Amicis) and others visiting the Italian peninsula (Grand Tourists, Madame De Staël), and we will study the real or imaginary travels of French, British and American writers to the Eastern Mediterranean and to antique and holy land (Jean-Jacques Barthélemy, Count Marcellus, Austen Henry Layard, Lord Byron, Mark Twain), as well as Arabic travel writers to the West (Rifā'ah Rāfi' al-Tahtāwī).

Related Courses

The Acropolis of Athens in the 6th and 5th Centuries BCE, Ioannis Mylonopoulos
AHIS UN2101
M/W, 8:40am-9:55am
Method of Instruction: On-Line Only


The Athenian Acropolis represents one of the most important sites of the ancient world. The impact of its architecture and sculpture on artistic and intellectual expressions of later periods goes beyond the limits of antiquity. The course takes into consideration the importance of the Parthenon in Columbia University’s core curriculum but aims also at the contextualisation of the monument within the broader context of the Athenian Acropolis during the sixth and fifth centuries BCE. The chosen chronological frame focuses on the period of the most intensive activity on the Acropolis, which correlates with the glorious days of Athenian power. 

Important notice: Because of the COVID-19 crisis and in order to help students cope with the unusual demands of online teaching, all readings, all powerpoint files, and all personal notes of the instructor will be posted on coursework in the first week of the term.

Directed Readings, Independent and Senior Research Seminars

Directed Readings, Nikolas P. Kakkoufa
GRKM UN3997 01
Directed Readings, Dimitris Antoniou
GRKM UN3997 02
Directed Readings, Karen Van Dyck
GRKM UN3997 03
Directed Readings, Stathis Gourgouris
GRKM UN3997 04
Directed Readings, Paraskevi Martzavou
GRKM UN3997 05
Senior Research Seminar, Nikolas P. Kakkoufa
GRKM UN3998 01
Supervised Independent Research, Nikolas P. Kakkoufa
GRKM GU4460 01
Supervised Independent Research, Dimitris Antoniou
GRKM GU4460 02
Supervised Independent Research, Karen Van Dyck
GRKM GU4460 03
Supervised Independent Research, Stathis Gourgouris
GRKM GU4460 04
Supervised Independent Research, Paraskevi Martzavou
GRKM GU4460 05

 

Spring 2021

Language Courses

Elementary Modern Greek II, Chrysanthe Filippardos
GRKM UN1102
M/W, 12:10pm-2:00pm

A continuation of UN1101, the students are expected to be able to read texts containing high frequency vocabulary and basic structures; understand basic conversations or understand the gist of more complex conversations on familiar topics; produce simple speech on familiar topics; communicate in simple tasks requiring a simple and direct exchange of information on familiar and routine matters; write short texts or letters on familiar subjects.

Intermediate Modern Greek II, Chrysanthe Filippardos
GRKM UN2101
M/W, 6:10pm-8:00pm

A continuation of UN2101, upon completion of the course, the students are able to read simple Greek newspaper articles, essays and short stories and to express their opinion on a number of familiar topics. In addition to these skills, students will be exposed to a number of authentic multimodal cultural material that will allow them to acquire knowledge and understanding of the vibrant cultural landscape of Greece today.

 Literature, Culture & History

The Ottoman Past in the Greek Present, Dimitris Antoniou
CLGM UN3110
T, 2:10pm-4:00pm

Almost a century after the dissolution of the Ottoman Empire, the Ottoman past lives on in contemporary Greece, often in unexpected sites. In the built environment it appears as mosques, baths, covered markets, and fountains adorned with Arabic inscriptions. It also manifests itself in music, food, and language. Yet Ottoman legacies also shape the European present in less obvious ways and generate vehement debates about identity, nation-building, human rights, and interstate relations. In this course, we will be drawing on history, politics, anthropology, and comparative literature as well as a broad range of primary materials to view the Ottoman past through the lens of  he Greek present. What understandings of nation-building emerge as more Ottoman archives became accessible to scholars? How does Islamic Family Law—still in effect in Greece—confront the European legal system? How are Ottoman administrative structures re-assessed in the context of acute socioeconomic crisis and migration? This course fulfills the global core requirement.

Related Courses

The Hybrid Voice: Comparative Diasporas and Translation, Karen Van Dyck and Brent Edwards
CPLS GR6111/ CLGM 8 8111 001
TR, 2:10pm-4:00pm


This seminar will focus on the theory and practice of translation from the perspective of comparative diasporas and the hybrid voice. Students are encouraged to come to the seminar with a text from any language they wish to translate. We will read key essays on translation focusing on the issues of language and script in relation to migration, uprooting, and imagined community. Rather than foregrounding a single case study, the syllabus is organized around the proposition that any consideration of diaspora requires a consideration of comparative and overlapping diasporas, and as a consequence a confrontation with creolization and translation. We will look at a range of literary representations of language-crossing and -mixing, especially in terms of their lessons for the practice of translation (including Greek, Chinese, French, Latin, Italian, and Albanian). The final weeks of the course will be devoted to a practicum where students will get a chance to workshop their own translation projects.

Directed Readings, Independent and Senior Research Seminars


Directed Readings, Dimitris Antoniou
GRKM UN3997 02
Directed Readings, Karen Van Dyck
GRKM UN3997 03
Directed Readings, Stathis Gourgouris
GRKM UN3997 04
Directed Readings, Paraskevi Martzavou
GRKM UN3997 05
Supervised Independent Research, Dimitris Antoniou
GRKM GU4460 02
Supervised Independent Research, Karen Van Dyck
GRKM GU4460 03
Supervised Independent Research, Stathis Gourgouris
GRKM GU4460 04
Supervised Independent Research, Paraskevi Martzavou
GRKM GU4460 05 
 

Summer 2021

Narratives of Mental Health in Greek Literature, Nikolas P. Kakkoufa
TBA