Spring 2015 Modern Greek Courses

Spring 2015 Modern Greek Courses

 
INTRODUCTION TO MODERN GREEK LANGUAGE AND CULTURE II-GRKM V1102. 4pts. Maria Hadjipolycarpou TR 9:00am-10:50am. This second semester course is designed for students who have taken the first semester course V 1101 or the equivalent. It focuses again on Greek as it is written and spoken in Greece today.  As well as learning the skills necessary to read texts of moderate difficulty and converse on a wide range of topics, students continue to explore Modern Greece's cultural landscape.

INTERMEDIATE MODERN GREEK LANGUAGE AND CULTURE II-GRKM V1202. 4 pts.  Maria Hadjipolycarpou TR 12:10pm–2:00pm. This second semester course is designed for students who have taken the first semester course V 1201 or the equivalent. In the spring term students complete their knowledge of the fundamentals of Greek grammar and syntax while continuing to enrich their vocabulary. The aim is to be able to read simple Greek newspaper articles, essays and short stories and to discuss and summarize them in Greek. Prerequisites: GRKM V1101-V1102 or the equivalent. Corequisites: Students are also required to take the conversation class, GRKM W1211 (below).

INTERMEDIATE MODERN GREEK CONVERSATION-GRKM W1212. 1pt. Maria Hadjipolycarpou F 11:00am–11:50am. For students in GRKM V1202; but also open to students not enrolled in V1201 above, who wish to improve their spoken modern Greek. For more information, contact Maria Hadjipolycarpou at mh3505@columbia
​.
THE WORLD RESPONDS TO THE GREEKS-CLGM V3920. 3pts. Stathis Gourgouris W 12:10pm-2:00pm. This course examines various literary, artistic, and cultural traditions that respond to some of the most recognizable Greek motifs in myth, theater, and politics, with the aim of understanding both what these motifs might be offering specifically to these traditions in particular social-historical contexts and, at the same time, what these traditions in turn bring to our conventional understanding of these motifs, how they reconceptualize them and how they alter them. The overall impetus is framed by a prismatic inquiry of how conditions of modernity, postcoloniality, and globality fashion themselves in engagement with certain persistent imaginaries of antiquity. Texts include various renditions of Antigone in African, Caribbean, Asian or Latin American traditions, poetry by Walcott, Cavafy, and Césaire, essays by Fanon, Soyinka, Senghor, and CL.R. James. This course fulfills the global core requirement. It can be taken with an extra-credit tutorial for students reading materials in Greek.

THE MAKING OF MODERN GREEK POETRY: SONG, FOLKLORE, AND HIP HOP-CLGM V3306. 3pts. Maria Hadjipolycarpou MW4:10pm-5:25pm. Hip-hop, a form of oral poetry and a performative practice, presents literary scholars and cultural critics with particular challenges, especially when emerging in a country like Greece, where poetry and performance have been the two major forms of artistic expression. The class will study the history of hip-hop globally, engage with the study of Modern Greek, primarily oral, rhymed, and folk, poetry--its themes, style and techniques. Students will think critically about the ramifications of hip-hop culture and the historical and political contexts in which hip-hop culture took, and continues to take, shape. Particular attention is paid to questions of race, gender, class, and globalization. The class will consider questions of orality, textuality and performativity: What is the relation of poetry and hip-hop? What traditions influence poetry and what hip-hop? Who writes poetry and who does hip-hop? Students will be asked to engage in creative projects such as, create a piece of Hip Hop art, write Hip Hop journalism, translate poetry from Greek to English, organize a poetry night or poetry slam contest, present a local performer in the form of an open interview in class. It can be taken with an extra-credit tutorial for students reading and performing materials in Greek.

DICTATORSHIPS & THEIR AFTERLIVES-CLGM G4005. 4pts. Dimitris Antoniou R 4:10pm-6:00pm What does the investigation of a dictatorship entail and what are the challenges to such an endeavor? Why (and when) do particular societies turn to an examination of their non-democratic pasts? What does it mean for those who never experienced an authoritarian regime first-hand to remember it through television footage, literature, and popular culture? To what extent do current economic and political crises alter public narratives of dictatorial pasts? This seminar examines the afterlives of dictatorships and the ways in which they are remembered, discussed, examined, and give rise to conflicting narratives in post-dictatorial environments. The course takes as its point of departure the case of the Greek military regime of 1967-1974, and draws on materials ranging from graphic novels to films, performance art, poetry, and architecture to consider issues such as resistance, complicity, censorship, witnessing, ghosts, and public history. Students will have the opportunity to participate in an international conference organized in conjunction with the class. It can be taken with an extra-credit tutorial for students reading materials in Greek.

DIRECTED READINGS-GRKM V3997. 1-4 pts. Designed for undergraduates who want to do directed reading in a period or on a topic not covered in the curriculum.

DIRECTED READINGS-GRKM W4997. 1-4 pts. Designed for graduates who want to do directed reading in a period or on a topic not covered in the curriculum.

SENIOR RESEARCH SEMINAR-GRKM V3998. 1-4pts. Designed for students writing a senior thesis or doing advanced research on Greek or Greek Diaspora topics.