Hellenic Studies Courses - Spring 2017

PROGRAM IN HELLENIC STUDIES
COURSES
SPRING 2017
 

Each of the following courses counts toward the special concentration in Hellenic Studies. For more information on the program please click here.

If you wish to register yourself as a concentrator in Hellenic Studies, please contact the Assistant to the Director of the Program, Michael Anthony Fowler

 

GRKM V1102. Elementary Modern Greek II. Maria Hadjipolycarpou. 4 points. M W 12:10pm-2:00pm

Prerequisites: GRKM V1101 or the equivalent. Continuation of GRKM V1101. Introduction to modern Greek language and culture. Emphasis on speaking, writing, basic grammar, syntax, and cross-cultural analysis.

GRKM V2102. Intermediate Modern Greek II. Maria Hadjipolycarpou. 4 points. M W 10:10am-12:00pm

Prerequisites: GRKM V2101 or the equivalent. Continuation of GRKM V2101. Students complete their knowledge of the fundamentals of Greek grammar and syntax while continuing to enrich their vocabulary.
 
GRKM UN3001 Advanced Modern Greek I. 3 points. Maria Hadjipolycarpou MW 2:40-3:55 

Prerequisites: GRKM V2012 or the equivalent. This semester we will continue to build language skills but with particular attention to speaking and writing Greek at the university level. We will focus on such topics as diaspora, history, family, ethnicity, literary tradition and gender. We will use materials from literature, historiography and literary criticism as a way to advance knowledge in Modern Greek literature and culture. In addition we will explore the diversity of Greek language as it is spoken in different regions and gain understanding of its evolution through time.

GRKM UN1112 CULTURAL DICTIONARY I. Karen Van Dyck. 1 point. F 10:10am-11:00am

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GRKM UN1212 CULTURAL DICTIONARY II. Karen Van Dyck. 1 point. F 11:10am-12:00pm

This conversation course is offered at two different levels (Elementary and Intermediate/ Advanced) and open to students in language courses or those simply wanting to keep up their Greek and dive into the Greek cultural landscape for an hour a week. Structured around key terms and concepts in Modern Greek culture, students explore the question of what culture is –Greek, Greek Diaspora, Greek-American, Balkan, European culture –, always in Greek and with an eye to the particulars. Topics range from Greek shadow puppet theater to the language question to the refugee crisis. The recurring concern is whether it is possible to construct a Cultural Dictionary and how one keeps it up-to-date and interdisciplinary.

GRKM UN3997 Directed Readings. 1-4 points.

Designed for undergraduates who want to do directed reading in a period or on a topic not covered in the curriculum.

GRKM UN3920 The World Responds to the Greeks. Dimitrios Antoniou. 3 points. M W 2:40pm-3:55pm

This course examines the way particular spaces—cultural, urban, literary—serve as sites for the production and reproduction of cultural and political imaginaries. It places particular emphasis on the themes of the polis, the city, and the nation-state as well as on spatial representations of and responses to notions of the Hellenic across time. Students will consider a wide range of texts as spaces—complex sites constituted and complicated by a multiplicity of languages—and ask: To what extent is meaning and cultural identity, sitespecific? How central is the classical past in Western imagination? How have great metropolises such as Paris, Istanbul, and New York fashioned themselves in response to the allure of the classical and the advent of modern Greece? How has Greece as a specific site shaped the study of the Cold War, dictatorships, and crisis?

CLIA GU4700 The Mediterranean in History and Anthropology. Konstantina Zanou. 3 points. M 4:10pm-6:00pm

This course will offer an overview of historical and anthropological writing on the Mediterranean from the birth of the field through the pages of Fernard Braudel’s celebrated book in the 1940s to the present day. It will trace the shifts in the ways we understand the Mediterranean by examining the sea as a malleable geographical space, which changes over time. It will explore topics such as the macro- and micro-histories of the Sea; the ‘history in’ and the ‘history of’ the Mediterranean; ‘anti-Meditterraneanism’; the revolutionary Mediterraneans; the colonial Mediterranean; the Grand Tour; the migrants in the Mediterranean; Italy in the Mediterranean, and others. Looking at the sea can tell us a lot about human life on land and can change our perspective on how we view this and other parts of the world.

HIST UN3152 Byzantine Encounters in the Mediterranean and the Middle East. Alexandre M. Roberts. 4 points. Tu 12:10pm-2:00pm

This seminar examines Middle Eastern and Latin Western encounters with Byzantine society and culture, focusing on the 6th-15th centuries. When merchants, pilgrims, scholars, diplomats, and soldiers visited the lands of the Greek-Christian-Roman empire of the Eastern Mediterranean (today called Byzantium), what did they see? And what did the rest of the world look like to the Byzantines? We will study primary sources left by medieval Greeks, Arabs, Latins, and others, critically examining the hermeneutical acts involved in each cultural encounter, in order to probe the meaning and significance of these encounters in western Eurasian society and culture. Interested students can apply to take the seminar here.

CSGM UN3567 Thessaloniki Down the Ages.: A City and Its Many Voices. Paraskevi Martzavou. 3 points. W 4:10pm-6:00pm

The seminar will explore the fascinatingly layered and multicultural history of Thessaloniki, the great city of Northern Greece and the Balkans. We will examine texts, archaeological evidence, literature, songs and movies and, in general, the materialities of the city, from the 6th century BCE down to the 21st cent CE. We will notably think about problems of history, identity and cultural interplay in reaction to recent work such as Mark Mazower's well known Salonica, city of ghosts (2004) and  Devin Naar's Jewish Salonica: between the Ottoman Empire and Modern Greece (2016). In addition to one weekly seminar there will be an optional extra weekly session for close readings in modern Greek for one extra credit.

GRKM GU4135 Topics Through Greek Film. 3-4 points.

Optional 1-point bilingual guided reading.

This course explores issues of memory and trauma, public history and testimony, colonialism and biopolitics, neoliberalism and governmentality, and crisis and kinship, all through the medium of Greek film. It brings the Greek cinema canon (Angelopoulos, Gavras, Cacoyiannis, Koundouros, et al.) into conversation with the work of contemporary artists, documentary filmmakers, and the recent “weird wave” and asks: what kind of lens does film offer onto the study of a society’s history and contemporary predicament? The viewing and discussion of films is facilitated through a consideration of a wide range of materials, including novels, criticism, archival footage, and interviews with directors. The course does not assume any background knowledge and all films will have English subtitles. An additional 1-credit bilingual option (meeting once per week at a time TBD) is offered for students who wish to read, view, and discuss materials in Greek.

Fall 2017: GRKM GU4135
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
GRKM 4135 001/18583 T 2:10pm - 4:00pm
Room TBA
Dimitrios Antoniou 3-4 2/20

GRKM UN3001 Advanced Modern Greek I. 3 points.

Prerequisites: GRKM V2101 or the equivalent.

This semester we will continue to build language skills but with particular attention to speaking and writing Greek at the university level. We will focus on such topics as diaspora, history, politics, and identity. We will use materials from literature, critical essays, historiography, film, and mass media as a way to advance knowledge in Modern Greek literature and culture. In addition we will explore the diversity of Greek language as it is spoken in different regions and gain understanding of its evolution through time. Materials include: essays (Seferis, Theotokas); newspaper articles; television interviews (Flessa and Papanikolaou); advertisement; stand-up-comedy (Lazopoulos); music (art-song, rebetika, hip-hop); theatre (Demetriades); literature (Roides, Papadiamantis, Kazantzakis, Lymberaki, Karapanou, Galanaki, Charalambides, Chatzopoulos, Chouliaras).

Spring 2017: GRKM UN3001
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
GRKM 3001 001/65260 M W 2:40pm - 3:55pm
408 Hamilton Hall
Maria Hadjipolycarpou 3 0
Fall 2017: GRKM UN3001
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
GRKM 3001 001/18201 M W F 4:10pm - 5:25pm
Room TBA
3 2/18

GRKM V3002 Advanced Modern Greek II. 3 points.

Prerequisites: GRKM V2101 or the equivalent.

This semester we will continue to build language skills but with particular attention to speaking and writing Greek at the university level. We will focus on such topics as diaspora, history, politics, and identity. We will use materials from literature, film and mass media as a way to advance knowledge in Modern Greek literature and culture. We will explore the diversity of Greek language as it is spoken in different regions and gain understanding of its evolution through time. The focus is on the Modern Greek Poetry. Materials include: music (Theodorakis, Chatzidakis); interviews (Flessa); essays (Garantoudes); poetry (Erotokritos, Solomos, Kalvos, Palamas, Sikelianos, Varnalis, Karyotakis, Cavafy, Seferis, Ritsos, Embeirikos, Elytis, Gatsos, Sachtouris, Vakalo, Anghelaki-Rooke, Mastoraki, Montis, Dimoula, Chouliaras, Calas.)

GRKM W2112 Intermediate Modern Greek Conversation. 1 point.

For students in GRKM V2102, but also open to students not enrolled in GRKM V2102, who wish to improve their spoken Modern Greek. For more information, contact Dr. Maria Hadjipolycarpou at mh3505@columbia.edu

CLGM G4290 Greece at the Crossroads. 3 points.

Human mobility in the Greek context covers a wide range of practices and historical experiences: labor immigration, diaspora, political exile, mandatory expulsions, repatriation and, more recently, migrations and diasporas from Eastern Europe and non-European countries to and via Greece. In this course, we will study various cases of population movements though the Greek national and other European borders. Our particular points of interest will include: a. the connection between human mobility and notions of Europeaness, b. the impact of human mobility on politics and culture and c. the impact of migrations and diasporas on the historical development of notions of self, nationhood, community and civil and human rights. Students will be invited to approach these issues through the exploration of specific case-studies, the study of bibliography and the use of a variety of primary sources (legal texts, autobiographical narratives, literature, films, artistic creation, performative arts etc.).

CLGM W4290 Greece at the Crossroads. 4 points.

This course introduces students to key aspects of Modern Greek culture as well as to faculty at Columbia working on Greece in different departments. Readings focus on moments when Greece's position at the crossroads between East and West become  comparatively relevant to particular disciplines. Students study works by poets, novelists, filmmakers, literary critics, historians, anthropologists and architects; Columbia faculty and invited guests then discuss their own scholarship in these fields. Texts are available in both English and Greek.  The course can be taken with a one-credit extra hour tutorial for advanced students reading materials in Greek.