Hellenic Studies Courses - Fall 2017

PROGRAM IN HELLENIC STUDIES
​COURSES 
FALL 2017
 
 Fall 2017 Greek, Modern UN1101 section 001- ELEMENTARY MODERN GREEK I

Course Number

Section/Call Number

Day & Time/ Location

Instructor

Points

Enrollment

Prerequisites

UN1101

001/16223

W 2:10pm-4:00pm
408 Hamilton Hall

Nikolas Kakkoufa

4

9/18

-

Course Description

 

This is the first semester of a year-long course designed for students wishing to learn Greek as it is written and spoken in Greece today. As well as learning the skills necessary to read texts of moderate difficulty and converse on a wide range of topics, students explore Modern Greece's cultural landscape from "parea" to poetry to politics. Special attention will be paid to Greek New York. How do "our", "American", "Greek-American" definitions of language and culture differ from "their", "Greek" ones?

 Fall 2017 Greek, Modern UN2101 section 001- INTERMEDIATE MODERN GREEK I

Course Number

Section/Call Number

Day & Time/ Location

Instructor

Points

Enrollment

Prerequisites

UN2101

001/92078

MW 10:10am-12:00pm

406 Hamilton Hall

Nikolas Kakkoufa

4

4/18

GRKM UN1101 and GRKM UN1102 or the equivalent​*

Course Description

This course is designed for students who are already familiar with the basic grammar and syntax of modern Greek language and can communicate at an elementary level. Using films, newspapers, and popular songs, students engage the finer points of Greek grammar and syntax and enrich their vocabulary. Emphasis is given to writing, whether in the form of film and book reviews or essays on particular topics taken from a selection of second year textbooks.

*Students who have not attended the 'Elementary Modern Greek I' course, but have prior knowledge, are requested to contact the instructor for further information.

 Fall 2017 Greek, Modern UN3001 section 001-ADVANCED MODERN GREEK I

Course Number

Section/Call Number

Day & Time/ Location

Instructor

Points

Enrollment

Prerequisites

UN3001

001/18201

MW 4:10pm- 6:00pm

406 Hamilton Hall

Nikolas Kakkoufa

3

2/18

GRKM V2101 or the equivalent*

Course Description

This semester we will continue to build language skills but with particular attention to speaking and writing Greek at the university level. We will focus on such topics as diaspora, history, politics, and identity. We will use materials from literature, critical essays, historiography, film, and mass media as a way to advance knowledge in Modern Greek literature and culture. In addition we will explore the diversity of Greek language as it is spoken in different regions and gain understanding of its evolution through time. Materials include: essays (Seferis, Theotokas); newspaper articles; television interviews (Flessa and Papanikolaou); advertisement; stand-up-comedy (Lazopoulos); music (art-song, rebetika, hip-hop); theatre (Demetriades); literature (Roides, Papadiamantis, Kazantzakis, Lymberaki, Karapanou, Galanaki, Charalambides, Chatzopoulos, Chouliaras).

*Students who have not attended the 'Elementary Greek I' or 'Intermediate Modern Greek I' courses, but have prior knowledge, are requested to contact the instructor for further information.

 Fall 2017 Greek, Modern UN3935 section 001 - HELLENISM&THE TOPOGRAPHICAL IMAGINATION

Course Number

Section/Call Number

Day & Time/ Location

Instructor

Points

Enrollment

Prerequisites

UN3935

001/88280

M 2:10pm-4:00pm

307 Pupin Laboratories

Dimitrios Antoniou

3

25/25

 

-

Course Description

This course examines the way particular spaces—cultural, urban, literary—serve as sites for the production and reproduction of cultural and political imaginaries. It places particular emphasis on the themes of the polis, the city, and the nation-state as well as on spatial representations of and responses to notions of the Hellenic across time. Students will consider a wide range of texts as spaces—complex sites constituted and complicated by a multiplicity of languages—and ask: To what extent is meaning and cultural identity, sitespecific? How central is the classical past in Western imagination? How have great metropolises such as Paris, Istanbul, and New York fashioned themselves in response to the allure of the classical and the advent of modern Greece? How has Greece as a specific site shaped the study of the Cold War, dictatorships, and crisis?

 Fall 2017 Greek, Modern UN3996 section 001 - READINGS IN MODERN GREEK

Course Number

Section/Call Number

Day & Time/ Location

Instructor

Points

Enrollment

Prerequisites

UN3996

001/63925

TBC

Dimitrios Antoniou

1

0

-

Course Description

The course allows students in Topics through Greek Film (G4135) with an intermediate to advanced level of Greek to supplement their study of that course’s theme through materials in Greek. Each week we will be reading short texts (excerpts from novels and essays, blogs, newspaper articles) on a theme discussed that week in G4135.

 Fall 2017 Greek, Modern UN3997 section 001 -  DIRECTED READINGS

Course Number

Section/Call Number

Day & Time/ Location

Instructor

Points

Enrollment

Prerequisites

UN3997

001/71049

TBC

Paraskevi Martzavou

1-4

0

-

Course Description

Designed for undergraduates who want to do directed reading in a period or on a topic not covered in the curriculum.

 Fall 2017 Greek, Modern UN3998 section 001 - SENIOR RESEARCH SEMINAR

Course Number

Section/Call Number

Day & Time/ Location

Instructor

Points

Enrollment

Prerequisites

UN3998

001/67571

TBC

TBC

1-4

0

-

Course Description

Designed for students writing a senior thesis or doing advanced research on Greek or Greek Diaspora topics.

 Fall 2017 Greek, Modern GU4135 section 001 - TOPICS THROUGH GREEK FILM

Course Number

Section/Call Number

Day & Time/ Location

Instructor

Points

Enrollment

Prerequisites

GU4135

001/18583

T 2:10pm-4:00pm

C01 80 Claremont Ave

Dimitrios Antoniou

3-4

5/20

-

Course Description

This course explores issues of memory and trauma, public history and testimony, colonialism and biopolitics, neoliberalism and governmentality, and crisis and kinship, all through the medium of Greek film. It brings the Greek cinema canon (Angelopoulos, Gavras, Cacoyiannis, Koundouros, et al.) into conversation with the work of contemporary artists, documentary filmmakers, and the recent “weird wave” and asks: what kind of lens does film offer onto the study of a society’s history and contemporary predicament? The viewing and discussion of films is facilitated through a consideration of a wide range of materials, including novels, criticism, archival footage, and interviews with directors. The course does not assume any background knowledge and all films will have English subtitles. An additional 1-credit bilingual option (meeting once per week at a time TBD) is offered for students who wish to read, view, and discuss materials in Greek.

 


 

 

GRKM GU4135 Topics Through Greek Film. 3-4 points.

Optional 1-point bilingual guided reading.

This course explores issues of memory and trauma, public history and testimony, colonialism and biopolitics, neoliberalism and governmentality, and crisis and kinship, all through the medium of Greek film. It brings the Greek cinema canon (Angelopoulos, Gavras, Cacoyiannis, Koundouros, et al.) into conversation with the work of contemporary artists, documentary filmmakers, and the recent “weird wave” and asks: what kind of lens does film offer onto the study of a society’s history and contemporary predicament? The viewing and discussion of films is facilitated through a consideration of a wide range of materials, including novels, criticism, archival footage, and interviews with directors. The course does not assume any background knowledge and all films will have English subtitles. An additional 1-credit bilingual option (meeting once per week at a time TBD) is offered for students who wish to read, view, and discuss materials in Greek.

Fall 2017: GRKM GU4135
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
GRKM 4135 001/18583 T 2:10pm - 4:00pm
C01 80 Claremont
Dimitrios Antoniou 3-4 5/20

GRKM UN3001 Advanced Modern Greek I. 3 points.

Prerequisites: GRKM V2101 or the equivalent.

This semester we will continue to build language skills but with particular attention to speaking and writing Greek at the university level. We will focus on such topics as diaspora, history, politics, and identity. We will use materials from literature, critical essays, historiography, film, and mass media as a way to advance knowledge in Modern Greek literature and culture. In addition we will explore the diversity of Greek language as it is spoken in different regions and gain understanding of its evolution through time. Materials include: essays (Seferis, Theotokas); newspaper articles; television interviews (Flessa and Papanikolaou); advertisement; stand-up-comedy (Lazopoulos); music (art-song, rebetika, hip-hop); theatre (Demetriades); literature (Roides, Papadiamantis, Kazantzakis, Lymberaki, Karapanou, Galanaki, Charalambides, Chatzopoulos, Chouliaras).

Fall 2017: GRKM UN3001
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
GRKM 3001 001/18201 M W 4:10pm - 6:00pm
406 Hamilton Hall
Nikolas Kakkoufa 3 2/18

GRKM V3002 Advanced Modern Greek II. 3 points.

Prerequisites: GRKM V2101 or the equivalent.

This semester we will continue to build language skills but with particular attention to speaking and writing Greek at the university level. We will focus on such topics as diaspora, history, politics, and identity. We will use materials from literature, film and mass media as a way to advance knowledge in Modern Greek literature and culture. We will explore the diversity of Greek language as it is spoken in different regions and gain understanding of its evolution through time. The focus is on the Modern Greek Poetry. Materials include: music (Theodorakis, Chatzidakis); interviews (Flessa); essays (Garantoudes); poetry (Erotokritos, Solomos, Kalvos, Palamas, Sikelianos, Varnalis, Karyotakis, Cavafy, Seferis, Ritsos, Embeirikos, Elytis, Gatsos, Sachtouris, Vakalo, Anghelaki-Rooke, Mastoraki, Montis, Dimoula, Chouliaras, Calas.)

GRKM W2112 Intermediate Modern Greek Conversation. 1 point.

For students in GRKM V2102, but also open to students not enrolled in GRKM V2102, who wish to improve their spoken Modern Greek. For more information, contact Dr. Maria Hadjipolycarpou at mh3505@columbia.edu

CLGM G4290 Greece at the Crossroads. 3 points.

Human mobility in the Greek context covers a wide range of practices and historical experiences: labor immigration, diaspora, political exile, mandatory expulsions, repatriation and, more recently, migrations and diasporas from Eastern Europe and non-European countries to and via Greece. In this course, we will study various cases of population movements though the Greek national and other European borders. Our particular points of interest will include: a. the connection between human mobility and notions of Europeaness, b. the impact of human mobility on politics and culture and c. the impact of migrations and diasporas on the historical development of notions of self, nationhood, community and civil and human rights. Students will be invited to approach these issues through the exploration of specific case-studies, the study of bibliography and the use of a variety of primary sources (legal texts, autobiographical narratives, literature, films, artistic creation, performative arts etc.).

CLGM W4290 Greece at the Crossroads. 4 points.

This course introduces students to key aspects of Modern Greek culture as well as to faculty at Columbia working on Greece in different departments. Readings focus on moments when Greece's position at the crossroads between East and West become  comparatively relevant to particular disciplines. Students study works by poets, novelists, filmmakers, literary critics, historians, anthropologists and architects; Columbia faculty and invited guests then discuss their own scholarship in these fields. Texts are available in both English and Greek.  The course can be taken with a one-credit extra hour tutorial for advanced students reading materials in Greek.